Faculty Resources

Washington University in St. Louis is a vibrant and diverse institution with multiple opportunities for faculty and staff. Learn about grant opportunities and resources available to faculty.

Interdisciplinary Teaching Grant Awards

Beyond Boundaries courses are designed to prepare students for a rapidly evolving world characterized by social, political, scientific and economic problems that cannot be solved using knowledge from a single discipline.  Team-taught by faculty from different schools across Washington University, Beyond Boundaries courses offer a window into how scholars from different disciplines approach big, critical topics – like our aging population, the nature of creativity, the phenomenon of climate change, the rise of a digital society and the evolving art of medicine.  These courses will equip students to make a difference in a complicated world, where challenges do not come pre-packaged as the territory of a single discipline.  These courses will transform the way students think about the world and help them become both more creative problem-solvers and more insightful scholars of life.

Interdisciplinary Teaching Grant Record article

2017-2018 Grant Recipients:

  • The Art of Medicine
    Course Description:
    Medical science, in its development over the past three thousand years, has explored ever more intricately the hidden landscape beneath the skin and has sought to understand, to preserve and enhance the wellbeing of the body: human health. To fulfill these aims and circulate this knowledge among experts and the wider public alike, medical science has bound itself to the arts and crafts: from hand-drawn illustrations of the anatomical body to MRI; from leeching and urine tasting by seventeenth-century barber surgeons to contemporary drug therapy, medicine has defined its mission and disseminated medical knowledge through images, words, crafts and technology.Within contemporary culture, there has been a perceptible move toward de-emphasizing the boundary conditions that strictly define medical science on one hand, and the arts on the other.  Indeed, art and medicine are not incommensurate fields. Confronting contemporaneous issues driven by the discourses of medicine, artists today are both mining content from the field and embracing the use of the corporeal body in their work, at times, refabricating the body in new and challenging ways. Likewise, a growing number of contemporary exhibitions linking the arts with medicine address ethical issues in medical practices and biotechnology as seen from the perspective of the non-specialist.This interdisciplinary, cross-school course at the intersection of history and the visual arts offers students a singular encounter with western medicine from ancient times to the present day. In tandem with the history of medicine, the course examines the capacity of the arts to frame medical practice and to raise questions and influence perceptions, both positively and negatively, of medical advancements.(Rebecca Messbarger, A & S/Romance Languages; Patricia Olynyk, Sam Fox/Director, Graduate School of Art)
    Course Video
  • Designing Creativity: Innovation Across Disciplines
    Course Description:
    Via a series of lectures from prominent thinkers and practitioners in the areas of medicine, neuroscience, law, engineering, architecture, human‐centered design, business, stage design, and the performing arts, Designing Creativity is a course that will explore the study and practice of the creative process across many disciplines. From “Ah‐ha” epiphanies to slow‐developing discoveries, the creative process has been employed by innovators and artists in virtually every corner of the globe for centuries. In this course, we will study the different processes of creatives in many fields. The class will also incorporate practice of design thinking and creativity techniques in a LAB component that will allow students to explore the development of innovative ideas in collaborative teams followed by project presentations to core faculty and classmates.(Rob Morgan, A&S/Performing Arts; Liz Kramer, Sam Fox)
    Course Video
    Student Written Article
  • Earth’s Future: Causes and Consequences of Global Climate Change
    Course Description:
    Climate change is said by many to be one of the most important issues of our time. Nine of the ten warmest years in the modern meteorological record (which goes back to the 19th century) have occurred since the year 2000, with 2015 and 2016 being the two hottest years to date (2017 is on track to be the second hottest yet). Today, the major political debates on the subject focus on whether climate is changing naturally, or if humans are causing climate change. The scientific reality, however, is that climates have changed through geological time, are changing now, and will continue to change in the future.(TR Kidder, A&S/Anthropology; Brent Williams, Engineering)
    Course Video
  • Gender, Youth and Global Health
    Course Description:
    Through in-depth case studies, this course provides an introduction to gender specific issues in the context of childhood and adolescence, poverty, and global health. Students will learn to identify how gender and gender differences affect conditions of life in the areas of reproductive health, nutrition, conflict, access to healthcare, and the social determinants of health, especially for young people. Students will learn to analyze health conditions and disparities in relation to both the micro dynamics of local worlds and the macro dynamics of large-scale social forces in the postcolonial global field. Additionally, they will come to understand the current challenges that global health practitioners and institutions confront in achieving gender equity and the current efforts towards closing the gap. These learning objectives will be achieved using lectures, but also discussions-based sessions and Skype-based interactions with NGOs and experts who are currently working in the field.(Jessica Levy, Brown School; Caline Mattar, School of Medicine)
  • When I’m 64: Transforming Your Future
    Course Description:
    Whether you know it or not, you’re living in the midst of a revolution – a revolution that is going to change your personal and professional lives. You will live into your 80s and 90s, with a 50% chance of seeing your 100th birthday. This demographic revolution is going to change the health care you receive, the house you live in, the car you drive, the jobs you do, and the relationships you have with family and friends. In other words, this revolution will shape every aspect of your life.This class will give you a competitive edge in understanding how you can harness these forces to shape your career and lifestyle. In this course, you will interact with leaders from many fields, including medicine, engineering, architecture, public health, social work, law, business, art, psychology, and anthropology. These leaders are all focused on issues of an aging society. There will also be opportunities to tailor your interests through events on and off campus, including movies, lectures, performances, field trips, and service learning. Each week, we will gather for lectures and break into small groups for discussion. This course will set you on a path to lead the aging revolution and transform the society of tomorrow.(Brian Carpenter, A&S/Psychology; Nancy Morrow-Howell, Brown School; Susy Stark, Medical School/Occupational Therapy)
    Promotion Video

2016-2017 Grant Recipients:

  • When I’m 64: Transforming Your Future
    (Brian Carpenter, A&S/Psychology; Nancy Morrow-Howell, Brown School; Susy Stark, Medical School/Occupational Therapy) – freshman class
    Promotion Video
  • Earth’s Future: Causes and Consequences
    (TR Kidder, A&S/Anthropology; Brent Williams, Engineering) – freshman class
  • The Art of Medicine
    (Rebecca Messbarger, A & S/Romance Languages; Patricia Olynyk, Sam Fox/Director, Graduate School of Art) –freshman class
  • Designing Creativity: Innovation Across Disciplines
    (Rob Morgan, A&S/Performing Arts; Bruce Lindsey, Sam Fox/Dean, College of Architecture) – freshman class
    Promotion Video
  • The Digital Society
    Course Description:

    The Digital Revolution is one of the most important social, technological, and policy issues of our time. We propose to assemble a group of Washington University faculty members to discuss and informally share perspectives on privacy, security and opportunity in today’s digital society. As the Internet and connected digital devices mediate a growing fraction of modern life, the treatment of personal information has become complex with many attendant demands and priorities. Notably, the desirable goals of personal privacy, commercial activity and public safety are often in conflict. Moreover, the rapid change of pace of technology frequently invalidates, or renders irrelevant, those tradeoffs that have in the past successfully achieved balance amongst these goals. We seek to support and cultivate the growing, diverse crossschool community examining these issues in order to prepare the ground for multidisciplinary courses and research initiatives.

    (Neil Richards, Law; Patrick Crowley, Engineering) – freshman class

  • Gender, Youth and Global Health
    (Bill Powderly, Medicine/Director, Institute for Public Health; Peter Benson, A & S/Anthropology) – freshman class

2015-2016 Grant Recipients:

2014-2015 Grant Recipients:

Interdisciplinary Teaching Grant Awards

Beyond Boundaries courses are designed to prepare students for a rapidly evolving world characterized by social, political, scientific and economic problems that cannot be solved using knowledge from a single discipline.  Team-taught by faculty from different schools across Washington University, Beyond Boundaries courses offer a window into how scholars from different disciplines approach big, critical topics – like our aging population, the nature of creativity, the phenomenon of climate change, the rise of a digital society and the evolving art of medicine.  These courses will equip students to make a difference in a complicated world, where challenges do not come pre-packaged as the territory of a single discipline.  These courses will transform the way students think about the world and help them become both more creative problem-solvers and more insightful scholars of life.

Interdisciplinary Teaching Grant Record article

2017-2018 Grant Recipients:

  • Visualizing Segregation
    Course Description:
    This inter-disciplinary course is designed to introduce you to the history of three of America’s major cities. We will explore the political, social and cultural histories of each of these cities while tracing changes in architecture and the built environment. We chose these three cities for their diverse and intersecting histories. In many ways, St. Louis, Chicago, and New Orleans represent the major social and political forces that forged the modern American city. From westward expansion and the growth of the slave system, through mass European immigration and industrialization, the rise of Jim Crow and the decline of American industry, suburbanization, mass incarceration, and gentrification: all are visible in the landscapes of these American cities. Segregation of social groups, so often seen as natural or inevitable, is the result of historical processes, political decisions, public policies and individual actions.The course, in addition, will provide you with the opportuni9ty to use some of the research techniques employed by urban scholars. We will engage in a major research project, tracing the history of St. Louis through a variety of primary sources. Our aim will be to trace the historical processes that generated urban landscapes divided along lines of race, class, ethnicity or religion.(Maggie Garb, A&S/History; Eric Mumford, Sam Fox/Visual Design) –upper level class

2016-2017 Grant Recipients:

  • The Business of Us All: In/Equality in Theory and Practice
    Course Description:
    This course uses a trans-disciplinary approach to discuss in/equality and its interrelated topics of inequality, inequity and social justice.  While the focus is on the U.S. predominantly, lessons learned from our global partners are important components of our discussions.  The course will emphasize the implications of our findings for other ethnic/racial minorities around the world. Equality speaks to issues of priority, fairness and impartiality.  On the other hand, inequality is defined as marked difference among individuals or groups of individuals in the distribution of social goods. Inequity, which considers bias, discrimination and injustice in distributive systems, pushes the discussion further. As the various forms of social, political and economic inequalities are mutually reinforced, we examine economic inequality, residential segregation and housing quality; dis/investment in neighborhoods and communities; resource allocation to low income, city and predominantly ethnic minority schools; academic underachievement of minority youth; access to and provision of appropriate healthcare; curtailment of social welfare programs; the presentation of stereotypical images of persons of color in the media and school curricula; morbidity, mortality, and longevity rates for persons of color; environmental hazards; the surge in incarceration related to substance abuse and escalating criminal prosecution, as well as discriminatory behavior of police and judges. All of the foregoing is made worse by race and gender status variables.  Such factors cannot be considered inconsequential to social im/mobility and equality in the larger society. The collateral damage borne by the intergenerational transfer of social im/mobility and in/equality to future generations are integral to course discussions.(Carol Camp Yeakey, A&S; Vetta L. Sanders Thompson, Brown School)
  • Religious Freedom in America
    Course Description:The intersection of religion and law in American society has sparked some of the fiercest cultural engagements in recent memory: Should a for-profit religious corporation have a right not to fund birth control for its employees? Can a public college expel campus religious groups whose membership is not open to all students? May a Muslim grow a beard for religious reasons in prison? Should a cake baker or a florist be permitted to refuse services for a gay wedding? Can a church hire and fire its ministers for any reason?These current debates and the issues that frame them are interwoven in the American story. In fact, the story of religious liberty in American history sheds light on the very meaning of this country as a political experiment in democratic pluralism. The architects of the American political order experienced and anticipated tensions between “church” and “state.” They wrote about the differences between “mere belief” and religious “conduct.” They debated the elusive “wall of separation.” They struggled to define the proper boundaries for the exercise of minority religious (and non-religious) beliefs, at various times including Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Catholics, atheists, Muslims, and evangelicals.This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the major texts and historical arguments concerning religious liberty in the United States. This course will draw from the respective expertise of the instructors, exposing students to a variety of scholarly methods related to the issue: legal history and case law, intellectual history and canonical texts, social history and narrative accounts, and political philosophy and contemporary analyses.We will integrate our major disciplinary approaches—law, political theory, and religious history—by placing key constitutional texts and cases into a chronologically organized historical framework. Specifically, the course covers European precedents to English settlement, the colonial period, nation-making and the Constitution, the early national period of religious revival and expansion, the Civil War and Fourteenth Amendment, Mormonism, fundamentalism and secularism in the Progressive Era, the Second World War and religious pacifism, The Cold War, the 1960s and school prayer, the rise of the Religious Right, and recent cases involving religious freedom.(John Inazu, School of Law; Mark Valeri, Religion and Politics)
    Profile

2015-2016 Grant Recipients:

2014-2015 Grant Recipients:

2011-2012, 2012-2013  Grant Recipients:

 

Bring Your Own Idea Grant Awards

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